Blog Archives

The Hawk Is Back

Posted on by Warren Clary / Comments Off on The Hawk Is Back

Story and Photos by Warren Clary When my wife Jeanne and I moved from Boise to Meridian in 2005, we acquired a new house on a nice-sized lot. The house was positioned off-center, within about six feet of
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Jean

Posted on by Lynda Huddleston / Comments Off on Jean

A Story of Love without Ego Story and Photos by Lynda Huddleston She was a true Texas girl at heart, with the stubbornness and grit to match. She didn’t have many close friends in our Meridian assisted living
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Potential Unbound

Posted on by Megan Egbert and Morgan Gariepy / Comments Off on Potential Unbound

Since 2013, the library has utilized 3D printing through programs, classes, and one-on-one assistance. We have helped everyone from senior citizens to five-year-old children with projects ranging from duck call whistles to a 3D diagram of a beetle. Continue reading

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The Boys Are Back

Posted on by Pat Walch / Comments Off on The Boys Are Back

Growing up in a small town like Meridian in the 1950s was probably the best start anyone could have in life: the perfect atmosphere to create memories and friends that would last a lifetime. But that was what a small town was about. We knew everybody, every kid in school—and everybody’s parents knew ours. Continue reading

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Wheelchair Engineer

Posted on by Paula M. Larson / Comments Off on Wheelchair Engineer

We met in the desert. I was working in “Accessibility Camp” at the Burning Man Festival in Nevada, where our goal was to help folks with mobility issues get around the dusty desert setting more easily.

One day I noticed these handcycles, which are just what they sound like—cycles you power by cranking pedals with your arms instead of your legs—made from old bikes and wood. I was told the cycles were donated to the camp by a guy from Idaho named Randy. Having mobility issues myself, I was curious about the man who created these rugged contraptions and wanted to learn more about how (and why) he made them. Continue reading

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