Lesson Plans

Idaho Contents Standards IDAHO magazine issue: article
6-12.USH1.2.2.2: Analyze ways in which the physical environment affected political and economic development. August 2003: Riggins Spotlight
 Goal 1.1 Goal 1.2 Goal 1.3: 1) Build an understanding of the cultural and social development of the United States. 2) Trace the role of migration and immigration of people in the development of the United States. 3) Identify the role of American Indians in the development of the United States. Accompanying PowerPoint November 2002: Sacajawea 2005: A Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Survey
136110: Examine the agents of socialization and understand how their effects vary through the different stages of life.
136111:
Explore the contributing factors and functions of deviant behavior
Accompanying PowerPoint
September 2002: Second Chances; The Idaho Youth Ranch
Goal 1.7: Trace how natural resources and technological advances have shaped human civilization. October 2001: Twin Falls; Spotlight City. Possible variations can be found in: February 2005: Moving American Falls; A Town, a Dam, a Prosperity Dream Lost.January 2006: Retrospective; Skiing at Sun Valley in the 1940s and 1950s. (America’s first destination ski resort.)July 2007: My First Real Job; Hardrock Mining
World History and Civilization 1.8.1:Find examples of how writing, art, architecture, mathematics, and science have evolved in western civilization over time.Accompanying PowerPoint November 2004: Built in Idaho; Architecture Classics.
SS goal 2.1: Analyze the spatial organizations of people and environment on the earth’s surface Any 4 IDAHO magazine articles. Group lesson of 4 students.
Goal 1.4  Analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States. September 2003: Nampa: Spotlight City
Geography goal 2.4 June 2007: Idaho Public Parks; Urban Wild. A possible variation using State Parks can be found in:June 2004: State Parks; Ten of Idaho’s Most Beautiful, Fascinating, and Popular
Goal 4.2: Building an understanding of the organization and formation of the American system of government.3 SS 4.2.2: Tell how local government officials are chosen July 2004: Idaho Governors: Saints and Scoundrels. Possible variations can be found in: May 2007: Glen Taylor (One of Idaho’s most colorful Senators).October 2007: The Lion Rising; William E. Borah, Part One.December 2007: The Lion of Idaho; William E. Borah, Part Two.
Goal 4.3: Build an understanding that all people in the United States have rights and assume responsibilities. August 2004: Art Attack; The Wreckreationist; Students Create Sculpture to Heighten Environmental Awareness.
6-12.USH1.1.1.2: Describe the experiences of culturally, ethnically, and racially different groups existing as part of American society prior to the Civil War. March 2004: Irish in Idaho.
6-12.USH1.1.3.2: Identify the role of American Indians in the development of the United States. October 2003: The Utter Massacre; Disaster on the Trail. Possible variations can be found in: November 2003: The Sacajawea Center; Tribute to a Shoshone Hero.January 2005: Ride Over Injustice; A Nez Perce Cowboy’s Last Dance at PendletonAugust 2005: Jeanne Givens; Teacher, former legislator, and prominent Coeur d’Alene Tribe member connects old and new lives.April 2006: Fort Hall; Spotlight CitySeptember 2006: Nakia Williamson Cloud paints Nez Perce tribal history.February 2007: Scotsmen Revisit the Coeur d’AleneMarch 2007: Lapwai; Spotlight CityAugust 2007: Weippe; Spotlight City
6-12.USH1.1.5: Trace the role of exploration and expansion in the development of the United States. January 2005: Idaho City; Spotlight City
6-9.GEH.5.1.5: Define ethnocentrism and give examples of how this attitude can lead to cultural misunderstandings. April 2007: Boise’s German Heritage; Lost in Time.
9-12.E.3.2.2: Explain and illustrate the impact of economic policies and decisions made by governments, business, and individuals9-12.E.3.3.2: Describe the elements of entrepreneurship December 2001: The Original King of Spuds
9-12.USH2.5.1.2-3:1) Explain common reasons and consequences for the breakdown of order among nation-states, such as conflicts about national interests, ethnicity, and religion; competition for resources and territory; the absence of effective means to enforce international law.2) Explain the global consequences of major conflicts in the 20th Century, such as World War I; World War II, including the holocaust, and the Cold War. April 2005: Vietnam Reflections. Possible variations can be found in: December 2001: Vernon Baker’s Medal of Honor (WWII veteran.)July 2007: Idaho’s Medal of Honor Recipients
Goal 1.7: Trace how natural resources and technological advances have shaped human civilization. February 2002:  “Wallace;
Spotlight City,”
9-12.E.3.3.2, 9-12.E.3.3.1. & 9-12.E.3.2.2:1) Describe the elements of entrepreneurship.2) Explain the characteristics of various types of business and market structures.3) Explain and illustrate the impact of economic policies and decisions made by governments, businesses and individuals.

June 2005: “Mary Jane’s Farm” by Carol Price Sturling, pp 12-19.

6-9.WHC.4.4.3: Analyze and evaluate the global expansion of liberty and democracy through revolution and reform movements in challenging authoritarian or despotic regimes. April 2006: “Idaho’s ‘Indiana Jones’,” by Margo Aragon.
World Studies, Grade 7: Identify the five themes of geography. All IDAHO magazine issues can be used. Lesson plan uses any Spotlight City article.
11th Grade, 497.01.d: Identify the causes and consequences of World War I. 489.01.c: Chronologically organize significant events and people in United States history into major eras and themes to identify and explain historical relationships.Accompanying PowerPoint June 2007: “Bliss;
Spotlight City”
Goal 5.1: Build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependenceAccompanying Supplement January 2005: “The Mail Via Wagon”
Goal 1.4, 1.7, 6-9.GEH.2.5.2:1) Analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States.2) Trace how natural resources and technological advances have shaped human civilization.3) Analyze and give examples of the consequences of human impact on the physical environment and evaluate ways in which technology influences human capacity to modify the physical environment September 2003: “Still Doing it the Old Fashioned Way”
Goal 1.4, 1.7:1) Analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States.2) Trace how natural resources and technological advances have shaped human civilization March 2003: “Idaho Roots: Pioneering Television’s Invention”
Goal 1.4: Analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States. June 2003: “Aviation Comes to Idaho”
US History 4.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.3:1) Provide and evaluate examples of social and political leadership in early American history.2) Evaluate the major foreign policy positions that have characterized the United States’ relations with the world.3) Discuss the use of the national interest as a criterion for shaping foreign policy.Accompanying Supplement IAccompanying Supplement II May 2003: “T.R. Makes a Big Hit in Idaho”
Goal 5.1, 5.1.2:1) Build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependence.2) Discuss the mutual impact of ideas, issues, and policies among nations, including environmental, economic, and humanitarian.Accompanying Supplement July 2004: “Saints and Scoundrels”
9-12.E.3.3.2 Describe the elements of entrepreneurship. November 2003: “The Breakfast Club”
9-12.USH2.1.2.3: Theme: Do people make history or does history make people April 2007: “Boise’s German Heritage: Lost in Time”
World Civilization, 7th Grade: Unit: Age of Industry  1750s-1900s—Growth and ModernizationTopic: List examples that show how economic opportunity and a higher standard of living are important factors in the migration of people. Show how transportation affects commerce. April 2004: “Mountain Home;
Spotlight City”
6-12.U.S.H1.1.1.2, 6-12.U.S.H1.1.3.1, 6-12.U.S.H1.1.3.2, 6-12.U.S.H1.1.3.3, 6-12.U.S.H1.1.5.5, 6-12.U.S.H1.1.5.1:1) Describe the experiences of culturally, ethnically, and racially different groups existing as part of American society prior to the Civil War.2) Trace the federal policies and treaties such as removal, reservations, and allotment throughout history that have impacted contemporary American Indians.3) Explain how and why events may be interpreted differently according to the points of view of participants and observers.4) Discuss the resistance of American Indians to assimilation.5) Explain the United States territorial expansion between 1801 and 1861 and identify internal and external conflicts.6) Examine the development of diverse cultures in what is now the United States.Accompanying Supplement August 2005: “Jeanne Givens: Here and Now”
9-12.USH@.1.4.2, 9-12.USH2.1.2.1:Theme: How an individual can make a difference.Goal: Understand the effect of the individual during the urbanizing of a small town in the West during the late 1800s. December 2006: “Hagerman;
Spotlight City”
Goal 4.3, 9-12.G.4.3.2:1) Build an understanding that all people in the United States have rights and assume responsibilities.2) Explain the implications of dual citizenship with regard to American Indians. August 2007: “Weippe;
Spotlight City”