Category Archives: 2015-07, July 2015 (Worley)

Fastest of Them All

I recently attended the annual sixth grade track meet at Ravsten Stadium in Idaho Falls to watch my niece and nephew compete.

The meet is a rite of passage, the final transition from grade school. It has been a tradition in Idaho Falls for at least forty-five years. This I know because I competed in my citywide sixth-grade meet. Continue reading

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Posted on by Steve Carr / Leave a comment

Farm Lessons

When I was a kid, my family’s farm near Filer in southern Idaho was a magical place, where anything could happen.

We had parts and pieces of things all over the place—we could make forts, dig for queen ants, play with electricity (hot wire and hose pipe tricks), skip rocks, climb haystacks—you get the idea. What I didn’t know until I left was that growing up on a farm and being part of the operation was the best gift I ever could have received. Continue reading

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Posted on by Diana Kauffman-Cockrell / 1 Comment

How to Engineer Magic

Like other children, I once dreamed of the possibilities of magic and fantasy worlds, of faraway places to visit, and fantastical wonders to see.

I dreamed of the amazing careers I’d have as a spy, a jungle explorer, an astronaut. With age, I realized such dreams are not easily grasped and that I would have to travel across continents to places of mystery, unless I used an entertainment medium to take me to far-off places. I began to seek ways to live out my dreams without leaving home. Continue reading

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Worley–Spotlight

Worley, population 257, doesn’t much resemble the bustling little community I knew as a kid. Located within the boundaries of the Coeur d’Alene Reservation, the white population surpasses the native one because of the Enlarged Homestead Act of 1909. The act targeted land suitable for dryland farming and opened the lands of three Northwest tribes to a lottery. Eighty percent of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe’s holdings passed out of its ownership during that time, and into the hands of homesteaders whose winning tickets entitled them to file a 160 or 320-acre claim. Continue reading

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Posted on by Sue Ellis / 7 Comments

Expedition Rediscovered

Unhitching the two old horses from the expedition wagon, one of the men led them deeper into the gentle bend of Idaho’s Snake River. He sloshed back to the wagon, leaving the team standing to drink their fill. Two spaced cracks of a rifle dropped each horse dead into the swirling waters. The winding current tugged old Bally and Star Crust into motion and they soon were swept from view. The two men heaved against their well-worn wagon, which they had affectionately dubbed the Science Car, pushing it into deeper water until the murky current grabbed and, like the horses, it too was taken beneath the surface. Continue reading

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A Blemished Beauty

Rock Creek Canyon isn’t particularly grand. It is easy to overlook. People do it every day. It isn’t listed in the Southern Idaho Visitor’s Guide as one of the “sights-not-to-be-missed,” nor is it overloaded with curious visitors.

The canyon isn’t ablaze with fiery red rock, and crystalline waterfalls aren’t part of its allure. It isn’t associated with the romance of Ernest Hemingway or with fly fishing. Rock Creek Canyon is mostly quiet, revealing its secrets only to those willing to seek its secluded, subtle wonders. I know, because I’ve been exploring the canyon for more than ten years as a walker and a runner, and I feel that with each visit to this wild space my claim to it has gradually grown into a deep and inexplicable connection. Continue reading

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Posted on by Shelley McEuen / Leave a comment

The Fishing Hole

When I was a young girl, a friend and her family took me fishing on Warm River, about fifteen miles north of Rexburg in Fremont County. I had never been fishing before, so it was a memorable experience. Last April, on a nice day to take a drive, when it was slightly overcast and I was suffering from a bit of spring fever, I set out to see if I could find the same area I had fished so many years earlier. Continue reading

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Posted on by The Editors / Leave a comment

Sippin’ Soda

In the corner of the dilapidated laundromat sat an old-fashioned soda pop machine filled with our favorite bottles of carbonated beverages.

We didn’t have money to buy those sugary treats but we figured out how to outsmart the machine with a small bottle opener and a long paper straw. It was easy. Pop the cap off, stick the straw in, and sip. This was our little secret, which we never told anyone. We thought we were being inventive, and it never once occurred to us that we were stealing from the company that sold the soda. Continue reading

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Posted on by Leona Campbell / Leave a comment