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The Matriarchs of Cindy Drive

Posted on by Janice Pollard / Comments Off on The Matriarchs of Cindy Drive

By Janice Pollard Photos courtesy of Janice Pollard In 1959, two women who had separately helped to design their all-brick, ranch-style homes moved into them across the street from each other in what was then a brand-new subdivision
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In Flight

Posted on by Joe Ruffing / Leave a comment

A spectacular summer day was brewing in Twin Falls in June 2013 when I bought a video camera to film a musician friend during his live performances. He wasn’t playing that day, but I was anxious to try out my new camera, and looked around for something to shoot. I was near the I.B. Perrine Bridge and decided to hike over and take a look, as I’d heard about people jumping off the bridge for fun. Continue reading

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Tipi of Steel

Posted on by Kathleen Mckevitt / Comments Off on Tipi of Steel

Walking with my dog on a cold Saturday in March on a path that led through the College of Southern Idaho campus in Twin Falls, I smelled burning wood. Ages ago, this very place where I was walking would have held many tipis with wisps of smoke ascending above their high poles from warming fires within. Continue reading

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A Blemished Beauty

Posted on by Shelley McEuen / Leave a comment

Rock Creek Canyon isn’t particularly grand. It is easy to overlook. People do it every day. It isn’t listed in the Southern Idaho Visitor’s Guide as one of the “sights-not-to-be-missed,” nor is it overloaded with curious visitors.

The canyon isn’t ablaze with fiery red rock, and crystalline waterfalls aren’t part of its allure. It isn’t associated with the romance of Ernest Hemingway or with fly fishing. Rock Creek Canyon is mostly quiet, revealing its secrets only to those willing to seek its secluded, subtle wonders. I know, because I’ve been exploring the canyon for more than ten years as a walker and a runner, and I feel that with each visit to this wild space my claim to it has gradually grown into a deep and inexplicable connection. Continue reading

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Legendary Foods

Posted on by Judy Grigg Hansen / Leave a comment

The alluring aroma of chocolate wafts through the house as I pull a chocolate chip cake from the oven. I don’t pretend to be a great cook, yet my chocolate chip cake is a dangerous enough confection to topple kingdoms.

A lightly chocolate oatmeal cake smothered in melted chocolate chips and walnuts, it’s moist and slightly springy, not at all like the dry, sterile offerings that begin in a box. Even so-so cooks like me can have a few moments of glory in the cooking hall of fame. Continue reading

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Rosalie Sorrels

Posted on by Kitty Delorey Fleischman / Comments Off on Rosalie Sorrels

Mellifluous. The word could have been coined especially to describe Rosalie Sorrels’ voice. Whether singing, or storytelling, the word fits. For days I’ve sought other, simpler words, but the search for vocabulary always dissolves to images. For Rosalie, speaking and singing are one. It’s how she communicates.

In her voice is the sound of Grimes Creek dancing over rocks and nudging flecks of gold along the course of its laughing waters. Then sometimes you’ll hear the gravel that lines the creek bed. You hear the trilling songs of birds that sail bright skies in her mountain sanctuary, and the shusshing sway of pine branches fluffed by breezes that sing to the cabin her father built by hand early in the last century. Sometimes you’ll catch a momentary glimpse of the sharp edges of rocks lining the canyon walls.

She came by it naturally as part of a well-read family of people who also loved to sing. As she talks, she switches from conversation to poetry to song in a smooth flow. In 1999 Idaho’s songbird also was chosen for a Circle of Excellence award from the National Storytelling Network.

For more than a half-century, Rosalie Sorrels has taken the sounds and stories of Idaho across the continent and beyond the seas. Jim Page, a folksinger from Whidby Island, Washington, once described Rosalie as “the most real person in folk music that I’ve ever met.” Now past her seventieth birthday, her outlook on life is both broader and narrower than it was when she was a younger woman. She has traveled extensively and has seen the world, yet the greatest treasures of her life are her family and her little handmade Grimes Creek cabin.

Her mother named the cabin Guerencia, which means “the place that holds your heart.” It’s a snug cabin with posters of her heroes on the ceiling so she can look up at them when she is in bed. The cabin’s walls are lined with books stacked layers deep on shelves, all of them read and all remembered.

As a youngster, Rosalie’s father gave her a dollar for each “chunk” of poetry she learned. She earned three dollars for learning Sir Walter Scott’s “Lady of the Lake.” When other youngsters were learning nursery rhymes, Rosalie learned to quote Shakespeare. Continue reading